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Category: Skin Care Recipes: General Info

  1. Natural Moisturisers in Hair and Skin Care Products

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    In addition to the oils provided by fats, the skin needs to bind moisture (water) in the outer layer. These are some of the substances available to achieve this end:

    Glycerine is one of the simplest and most widely-used of all moisturisers. It is technically an alcohol, and is a by-product of the soap industry. Natural handmade soaps retain their natural glycerine, which makes them a gentler, more soothing product than many commercially produced soaps. Large commercial soap makers often extract the glycerine naturally produced in the soap making process when making triple-milled soap.

    Use up to 5% glycerine in your moisturising creams, and add to the water stage ingredients.


    D-Panthenol or Vitamin B5, must be added when the cream mixture is at 40 degrees C. It is suitable for both hair as well as skin products, as it leaves a protective film on the hair, making it an invaluable addition to conditioning creams. D-Panthenol also speeds up cellular regeneration and is antibacterial, enabling speedier healing of spots, sores, irritations, infections and sun damage.

    Use up to 5% in your hair and skin products.


    Sorbitol is synthesised from glucose and starch, and occurs naturally in fruit. It can be used as a substitute for glycerine, and it leaves a soft, smooth feel to the skin. Used in cream and gel skin cleansers, it leaves the skin feeling soft and refreshed. Add to the water stage ingredients.

    Use up to 5% in hair and skin products.


    Lactic Acid is both a PH regulator and a moisturiser. Use up to 3% in creams and hair conditioners. Add when the temperature of the cream drops to 40 degrees C.


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  2. Natural Colourant Oil for Lip Balms and Glosses

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    Alkanet root is a natural pink to red colourant that can be used as part or all of the oil component in lip balm/gloss recipes. It is well worthwhile to have a supply of this natural colourant to hand as the colour of the finished product can be varied by adding more or less of the coloured oil.

     

     

    You will need:

     

    5g chopped alkanet root

    150g sweet almond oil

     

     

    Method:

     

    Place the oil and alkanet root in a heatproof glass or ceramic container, and place it in a double boiler or bain marie. Bring the water to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer for fifteen minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to cool. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and bottle the coloured oil.

     

    Other natural colourants that can be used in this way are:

     

    Annatto seeds (deep yellow/orange)

    Beetroot powder (deep red)

     

     

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  3. How To Make Carrot Oil

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    Carrot oil is high in vitamins A, B, C, D & E and is a valuable aid to skin that is dry, damaged, blemished or aging. Here is a recipe for carrot infused in coconut oil to include in rejuvenating skin care products. This recipe makes a solid orange oil that is ideal in skin creams, ointments, salves and balms – use olive or almond oil if you wish your carrot oil to be in a liquid state.

     

     

    You will need:

     

    2 carrots, peeled and grated.

    Coconut oil

     

     

    Method:

     

    Place the grated carrot in the crock of a slow cooker. Add sufficient melted coconut oil to cover and pour it over the carrot. Replace the lid on the slow cooker and cook the carrots and coconut oil at the lowest heat setting until the carrots are very soft and the oil is a deep orange colour. Remove from the heat and strain the oil through a fine mesh sieve.

     

    Pour into dark, glass jars and allow to cool and set.

     

     

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  4. How To Make A Herbal Tincture

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    Herbal tinctures are liquid preparations where the active ingredient of the herb has been extracted using alcohol. Because alcohol is present, tinctures have a long shelf life.

    Vodka is ideal to use for herbal tinctures because it is has virtually no fragrance. Use 25% alcohol to 75% spring water.

    Dried or fresh herbs can be used in tinctures; weigh dried herbs at 33% of the total liquid content; weigh fresh herbs at 100% of the total liquid content. Pour the liquid into a glass jar and add the herbs, making sure the herbs are completely covered by the liquid.

    Store the jar in a cool, dark place for two weeks, shaking it once a day. After two weeks, strain the mixture through muslin or cheesecloth into another jar. Make sure to squeeze as much fluid as possible from the plant material.

    Keep the tincture in glass containers in a cool, dark place. If prepared and stored correctly, your tincture should keep for up to two years
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  5. Coconut and Neem Oil Salve

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    Use this salve topically for chronic skin conditions such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. Coconut oil and oregon grape root can also be taken orally for added efficacy.

    You will need:

    78g coconut oil (solid)
    20g neem oil
    3 x oregon grape root capsules
    1ml cedarwood essential oil


    Method:

    Melt the coconut and neem oils in a double boiler. Take off the heat when melted, and stir in the contents (herb powder) of the oregon grape root capsules. Add the cedarwood essential oil. Stir until cool and set, and put into a clean, dark glass jar. Keep refrigerated as the oils have a low melt point.


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